On January 1, 2023, Washington joined the growing list of states requiring pay transparency in job postings. Amendments (the “Amendments”) to the Washington State Equal Pay and Opportunities Act (the “EPOA”) require covered employers to disclose pay range, benefits, and other compensation in job postings. The Washington Department of Labor and Industries issued an administrative policy (the “Guidance”) to provide guidance regarding the broadened disclosure requirements.

Continue Reading Pay Equity in Washington: Pay Transparency Comes to the Evergreen State

On January 26, 2023, a Michigan appellate court panel in Mothering Justice v. Attorney General issued a ruling to halt changes to the State’s paid sick leave law and an increase to the State’s minimum wage for hourly workers that were set to go into effect on February 19, 2023. The ruling is the latest development in a saga that has been ongoing for more than four years.

Continue Reading Michigan Employers Need Not Amend Their Paid Sick Leave Policies and Hourly Wages

On January 26, 2023, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) released guidance entitled Artificial Intelligence Risk Management Framework (AI RMF 1.0) (the “AI RMF”), intended to help organizations and individuals in the design, development, deployment, and use of AI systems. The AI RMF, like the White House’s recently published Blueprint for an AI Bill of Rights, is not legally binding. Nevertheless, as state and local regulators begin enforcing rules governing the use of AI systems, industry professionals will likely turn to NIST’s voluntary guidance when performing risk assessments of AI systems, negotiating contracts with vendors, performing audits on AI systems, and monitoring the use AI systems.

Continue Reading NIST Publishes Artificial Intelligence Risk Management Framework

As featured in #WorkforceWednesday:  The SECURE 2.0 Act of 2022 (“SECURE Act 2.0”) is a sweeping piece of retirement legislation with complex new provisions. This week, we highlight a few of the SECURE Act 2.0’s key changes for employer-sponsored 401(k) plans.

Continue Reading Video: SECURE Act 2.0 – What 401(k) Plan Sponsors Need to Know – Employment Law This Week

While most people were wrapped up in the inevitable hustle and bustle of the holidays, Vermont Governor Phil Scott announced the Nation’s second voluntary paid family and medical leave program, the Vermont Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Plan (VT FMLI). Initially part of a failed joint proposal with New Hampshire – the Twin State Voluntary Leave Plan – the VT FMLI largely mirrors New Hampshire’s Granite State Paid Family Leave Plan by establishing a State insurance program in which private employers and individuals may voluntarily participate.

Continue Reading The Green Mountain State Unveils Its Voluntary Paid Family and Medical Leave Insurance Plan

As featured in #WorkforceWednesday:  This week, we explain how New Jersey’s WARN Act (officially known as the “Millville Dallas Airmotive Plant Job Loss Notification Act”) is set to become the strictest and most punitive in the nation.

Continue Reading Video: New Jersey’s WARN Act to Become Strictest in Nation – Employment Law This Week

California is one of a growing list of states requiring employers to make certain pay transparency disclosures to employees and applicants. California employers already had an obligation to provide pay scales to job applicants upon request; however, as we previously reported, under SB 1162, employers must now disclose pay scales to current employees upon request, and employers with 15 or more employees must include pay scales in job postings.

Continue Reading California’s New Pay Scale Disclosure Requirements Guidance

The post-#MeToo reforms to New York State’s Human Rights Law, which expanded the anti-sexual harassment provisions, included a requirement that the state’s model policy, last issued in 2018, be reviewed and revised every four years. On January 12, 2023, the New York State Department of Labor (“NYSDOL”) published a Proposed Sexual Harassment Prevention Model Policy (“Proposed Model Policy”). The public has until February 11, 2023, to view and comment on the proposed revisions prior to a final version being adopted.

Continue Reading Proposed Changes to New York’s Sexual Harassment Prevention Model Policy

As the year 2022 was ending and 2023 got underway, New York Governor Hochul kept busy reviewing bills that were passed throughout the year but delivered to her for signature only after the November elections. Both houses of the New York State Legislature approved a total of 1,007 bills during the regular 2022 Legislative Session, a “modern-day record,” according to this December 20, 2022 interim report from the New York State Association of Counties. The Governor approved much of this legislation, but rejected a few measure.

Continue Reading In New York, Not Just Snow Flurries: A Flurry of Executive Action on a Year’s Worth of Employment Legislation

On December 28, 2022, New York Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law Senate Bill 9450, which added new enforcement provisions to the New York Health And Essential Rights Act’s (NY HERO Act) workplace safety committee requirements. The new law went into effect immediately upon the Governor’s signature.

Continue Reading New York HERO Act Enhanced Workplace Safety Committee Enforcement Provisions Enacted