The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”) protects individuals who are at least 40 years of age from discrimination in the workplace. As such, the outcome of disparate-impact claims under the ADEA hinges, ordinarily, on whether or not an employer’s facially neutral-policy has a disparate impact on employees who are 40 years of age or

By Matthew Sorensen and Dana Livne

One of the major ways in which American employment law has traditionally differed from its British counterpart has been its entrenched employment “at-will” doctrine. The “at-will” employment doctrine provides employers with the right to terminate their relationships with their employees at any time, with or without notice or cause. 

The April issue of “Take 5: Views You Can Use,” written by David W. Garland, a Member of the Firm in Epstein Becker Green’s New York and Newark  Offices, David W. Garlanddiscusses a number of topics relevant to employment in the financial services industry.   In these times of continuing downsizing at many financial services firms, we

by Carrie Corcoran, Matthew T. Miklave, and Susan Gross Sholinsky

 The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") has issued a long-awaited final rule ("Final Rule"), which amends the regulation on the "reasonable factors other than age" ("RFOA") defense available under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act ("ADEA"). The Final Rule is available at