The Grain Journal recently published a series of seven articles by the national OSHA Practice Group at Epstein Becker Green.  The articles outline a checklist for employers to follow in order to comply with OSHA’s complex Injury & Illness Recordkeeping regulations. The articles are broken down as follows:

  1. Scope of OSHA’s Injury & Illness Recordkeeping

February 1st is an important annual OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping deadline. Specifically, by February 1st every year, certain employers are required by OSHA’s Recordkeeping regulations to:
 1.Review their OSHA 300 Log;
 2.Verify that the entries are complete and accurate;
 3.Correct any deficiencies on the 300 Log;
 4.Use the injury data from the 300 Log to

February 1st is an important annual OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping deadline for all U.S. employers, except for those with only ten or fewer employees or who operate in enumerated low hazard industries such as retail, service, finance, insurance or real estate (see the industries partially exempted from OSHA’s Injury & Illness Recordkeeping regulations